I'm Pepsiman, a freelance Japanese-English translator and founder of Tanpenshuu Translations. Sometimes I do it for fun and other times I do it to make my bank account slightly larger and be able to keep the lights on! If you're interested in hiring me for translation work, click on the "My Translations" link, which will take you to my portfolio that also details all the ways you can reach me! 「短篇集トランスレーションズ」という独立翻訳グループを設立したフリーの和英翻訳者です。お仕事にお雇いになりたいとお思いになっていらっしゃる方は以下の「コンタクト」か「和英翻訳集」というセクションで書いてあるアドレスでいつでもご遠慮なく是非ご連絡なさって下さい!

 

truewildcard asked
Heya. Do you have a link to your post regarding Celeste Ludenberg's speaking quirks in DanganRonpa? It was extremely insightful, and i'd very much like to read it again.

Here you go!

image

Pic mostly unrelated, but very delightful nonetheless.

Thank you for writing so many words about a dumb thing that crossed my mind at like, 3 in the morning!

When I get curious, ain’t nobody’s gonna stop me, so we all came out winners in the end! If you ever think of any more, don’t hesitate to keep them coming!

Here’s a vaguely related picture about Japanese video games because, I don’t know, happy times!

iheartsenpai asked
Oh dear, I just saw your user reaction post to OreShika and it does explain a the user reactions on what other sites were reporting earlier this summer. Still, like the other tumblr user mentioned, Nueko might be there to help Western audiences relate to the game more, though I love the family system in the first OreShika. Maybe the developers will do an International Edition that will hopefully fix the issues? Except Nueko, since she's like, the Harbringer of OreShika.

I suspect that if nothing else, the US and European editions will have the Japanese patches baked into them at launch. That’s all but standard practice at this point for localizations that come out later than the original Japanese version. So on that front, for what it’s worth, a lot of the more nitpicky points will hopefully be taken care of, especially in terms of gods staying permanently unlocked and whatnot. (There’ll be hell to pay if they still disappear and have to be reunlocked repeatedly by the time I play it myself!) It would also be nice if they did something about the locked off sections in dungeons that require you to fetch keys from elsewhere with neither hide nor hair of a hint about where to get them without paying for them, since I feel like the original game is much, much better about organically encouraging you to spread your wings around and not just focus on one dungeon completely, but that might be a lost cause given how hard-coded into the game design it probably is.

Nueko throws an interesting wrench into things. Only in an Oreshika game could the introduction of an actual named, fixed party member actually be such a big deal, yet here we are. All other things being equal, I doubt her presence deprives the game of its fundamental sense of fun; the improved character customization and whatnot for family members alone is probably enough to still get excited for as a fan personally since I really do love the first game even just on a purely mechanical level. I think people would have less of a problem with her if either she didn’t have that really dumb sounding requirement of needing to be revived —Amazon Japan makes it sound like you might not have to necessarily do it right away when she dies every time, so you can maybe procrastinate until the plot demands it or something, but still— or at the very least her character class in battle wasn’t fixed, which to my knowledge it is. Useful in combat or not, that alone can definitely throw a huge wrench into how you play the game since at least in the original, you plan your classes around not only what kids are inherently going to be good at, but also to balance out other party members’ strengths and weaknesses and not being able to do anything about that with her around sounds iffy.

Like I said, I’ll probably still play it in the end because even if I have my reservations about what stuff like Nueko stands for symbolically in light of the original game’s accomplishments, it’s still likely going to be a mechanically neat game that has unique stuff no other game out there is still really tackling all these years later. I absolutely adore that first game and think it’s one of the best games of all time, but there are definitely a handful of mechanical things that I think could be improved these days and it would be nice to see if at least the core fundamentals of Oreshika 2 make for a better playing game.

But yeah, I remain extremely curious to see how this game fares once it’s out in people’s hands overseas. I wish the first game had been afforded that chance, too, but I think corporate politics basically killed its chances for both on the PS1 and the PSP, albeit for different reasons. A flawed sequel is probably better than nothing at all for getting the series some exposure.

humansofnewyork:

"A few years ago, I got a call on my cell phone from a twelve year old child from my village. He was calling me from a bus stop. He’d taken a bus into the city alone, and he was calling me to ask if I could help him find a way to go to school. Both of his parents had died of AIDS, and he had no money for tuition. I told him to stay where he was, and left work immediately to pick him up. At first I was very mad at him. He should not have travelled alone. But then I looked at him and I saw myself. I’d also been desperate to go to school after my father was killed, but we had no money. So even though I was suffering myself, I told him I would try to help him. My salary was not enough, so I tried many things to get the money. After work, I went to the landfill to hunt for recyclables. But after I paid to have them cleaned, there was no money left. Now I’m trying to make bricks. I have a small operation in the village to make bricks, and I sell them in the city. It doesn’t make much money, but it’s enough to pay tuition for the boy and three of his siblings.” (Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"A few years ago, I got a call on my cell phone from a twelve year old child from my village. He was calling me from a bus stop. He’d taken a bus into the city alone, and he was calling me to ask if I could help him find a way to go to school. Both of his parents had died of AIDS, and he had no money for tuition. I told him to stay where he was, and left work immediately to pick him up. At first I was very mad at him. He should not have travelled alone. But then I looked at him and I saw myself. I’d also been desperate to go to school after my father was killed, but we had no money. So even though I was suffering myself, I told him I would try to help him. My salary was not enough, so I tried many things to get the money. After work, I went to the landfill to hunt for recyclables. But after I paid to have them cleaned, there was no money left. Now I’m trying to make bricks. I have a small operation in the village to make bricks, and I sell them in the city. It doesn’t make much money, but it’s enough to pay tuition for the boy and three of his siblings.” 

(Kampala, Uganda)

officerjimenez asked
you say you're done with atlus' media blitz, i'm honestly expecting p5 trailers to start showing up within like a week just to mess with you.

You know, I’m generally the type of person that doesn’t worry about things until they’re really happening. “I’ll cross that bridge when I get there,” basically.

But even just thinking about that scenario hypothetically…

Realistically speaking, assuming P4D and/or P5 are still on schedule for releasing within the original time frames that Atlus announced last year, it’s a pretty sure bet that at least one of them is going to start seeing some marketing crop up right around TGS, which kicks off September 18. Atlus apparently doesn’t have its own booth, I haven’t checked the listings for myself, but Sega does, so I wouldn’t be surprised if Atlus piggybacks off of them. At the very least, if they still intend to put out P4D in that fall 2014 window, they’re starting to run out of time (by major publisher standards, mind) to really get the word out about the game unless they do it soon, but yeah.

I know deep down in my heart of hearts I probably only have a few weeks to myself. I’ll save the tears for when I know for certain my time is up.

Okay, maybe I’ll sob a little right now anyway. ;____;

gruntythrst asked
Here's a random question for you: what the hell is up with Like Likes from Legend of Zelda? Is it a bad translation? Is there some sort of pun in the Japanese name?

I actually had to go look this up because I’d never even thought about this before. So like a lot of Zelda enemies, I believe, the English name Like Like itself is a pretty straightforward transliteration of the original Japanese name ライクライク (raikuraiku). But you’re right in thinking that there’s a separate layer of meaning to it in Japanese in that it’s basically an elaborate bastardization of a native colloquialism. It takes several steps to see the logic and the whole impact can only really be felt if you know the language, but I’m gonna crib a flowchart from Pixiv’s encyclopedia page on Like Likes and break it down as best I can.

  • 蓼食う虫も好き好き (たでくうむしもすきずき; tade kuu mushi mo sukizuki). This is a phrase that basically means “to each their own,” in terms of likes and whatnot. The phrase is literally referring to how there are bugs out there that will feast on Japanese knotweed, despite it having an apparently unpleasant taste at least to us humans. Those who can read Japanese and want to know more about the literal meaning and history of the phrase and whatnot can brush up on it here, but for everyone else, there are two parts of the phrase worth paying attention to, 蓼 (tade) and 好き好き (sukizuki), and the reason for that will become apparent soon.
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  • 盾食う虫も好き好き (たてくうむしもすきずき; tate kuu mushi mo sukizuki). Here the phrase starts taking a turn for the punny, as the first word in the original phrase, 蓼 (tade), has now been substituted with 盾 (tate), which means shield. As a lot of fans probably know, Like Likes tend to take, ah, quite a liking to messing up your shields in the Zelda games if you let them swallow you. So that part of the equation is technically taken care of, but we’re still quite not at the name proper. For that, we’re gonna need two more steps.
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  • 好き好き (すきずき; sukizuki). Now it’s been reduced to just the last part of the original phrase. While the word as it’s first written here can function as a noun to mean “as a matter of taste,” way more commonly, as many learners should be able to attest, when there’s only one of them on their own, it’s read as 好き (suki), which is an adjective used in Japanese to express you "like" something. Ergo, when you put 好き好き through a weird translation blender and set it to ice crush mode, you get…
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  • ライクライク (ライクライク; raikuraiku), or Like Like.

I wouldn’t call it a particularly great name knowing that, but figuring out that origin is, if nothing else, a real journey.

Hope that helps!

Out of the transgender closet: From national moral model to trans woman

offbeatchina:

On August 14, Liu Ting, who’ve received titles like “China Moral Model,” “China Filial Piety Model” and “Pride of Zhejiang,” announced in a press conference that he has decided to become a woman. The news has made national headlines as if there is something about transgender that goes against…